WWI Commemorative Envelope

A special commemorative limited edition envelope will be issued by Britain’s Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territory Guernsey, Isle of Man, Jersey and Gibraltar on 11 November 2018 to mark 100 years since the signing of the Armistice Treaty. The collaboration brings together one stamp from each of the postal administrations’ First World War issues released in recent times to commemorate 100 years of the Great War. The stamps, which are cancelled with the date 11.11.18, are affixed to a specially designed envelope entitled ‘Remembering the Sacrifices of our Men and Women in WWI – Gibraltar, Guernsey, Isle of Man, Jersey Remembers’. A card inserted into the envelope tells the story of each of the stamps; 1. The Gibraltar War Memorial 2.Guernsey’s war-time volunteers 3.Isle of Man’s ANZAC Memorials of Rayner Hoff 4.Jersey’s men and women who became embroiled in WWI.

Calpe House

In 1991 a group of friends got together in Gibraltar to realise their dream of having a House in central London where sponsored patients, sent to London for treatment, could be accommodated for free instead of staying in Hotels. With the generosity of the people of Gibraltar and the help of the Gibraltar Government at the time, the dream became a reality and a property was purchased in Princes Square, Bayswater, London W2. The House could accommodate 11 patients and their carers. Since the House opened its doors, over 25 years ago, a total of nearly 6000 patients have made use of its facilities. Calpe House became a Home from Home and a Household name. It has become probably the most popular local Charity on the Rock. Over the last few years the original House became too small to meet the demands so a new property was purchased in Norfolk Square, Paddington, London W2 and on the 1st August 2018 its 37 on suite rooms became available. Once again this was possible through the generosity of the general public of Gibraltar, many Corporate sponsors and the Gibraltar Government who stand 100% behind this Charity. Calpe House is always looking for people to become Friends of the Charity.

Design: Stephen Perera, Photography: Leslie Gaduzo, Printer: Bpost Security Printers, Issue Date: 2 November 2018

Christmas

The nativity of Jesus or birth of Jesus is described in the gospels of Luke and Matthew. The two accounts agree that Jesus was born in Bethlehem in the time of Herod the Great, that his mother Mary was married to Joseph, who was of Davidic descent and was not his biological father, and that his birth was effected by divine intervention, but the two gospels agree on little else. Matthew does not mention the census, annunciation to the shepherds or presentation in the Temple, and does not give the name of the angel that appeared to Joseph to foretell the birth. In Luke there is no mention of Magi, no flight into Egypt, or Massacre of the Innocents, and the angel who announces the coming birth to Mary is named (as Gabriel).

The consensus of scholars is that both gospels were written about AD 75-85, and while it is possible that one account might be based on the other, or that the two share common source material, the majority conclusion is that, in respect of the nativity story, the two are independent of each other.

In Christian theology the nativity marks the birth of Jesus in fulfillment of the divine will of God, to save the world from sin. The artistic depiction of the nativity has been an important subject for Christian artists since the 4th century. Since the 13th century, the nativity scene has emphasized the humility of Jesus and promoted a more tender image of him, as a major turning point from the early “Lord and Master” image, mirroring changes in the common approaches taken by Christian pastoral ministry.

The nativity plays a major role in the Christian liturgical year. Christian congregations of the Western tradition (including the Catholic Church, the Western Rite Orthodox, the Anglican Communion, and many Protestants) begin observing the season of Advent four Sundays before Christmas, the traditional feast-day of his birth, which falls on December 25.

Christians of the Eastern Orthodox Church and Oriental Orthodox Church observe a similar season, sometimes called Advent but also called the “Nativity Fast”, which begins forty days before Christmas. Some Eastern Orthodox Christians (e.g. Greeks and Syrians) celebrate Christmas on December 25. Other Orthodox (e.g. Copts, Ethiopians, Georgians, and Russians) celebrate Christmas on (the Gregorian) January 7 (Koiak 29 on coptic calendar) as a result of their churches continuing to follow the Julian calendar, rather than the modern day Gregorian calendar.

Design: Stephen Perera, Printer: Bpost Security Printers, Issue Date: 2 November 2018

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